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May 13, 2013

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As most people have already mentioned, I was unaware of the fact that many common vegetables are in the same family as tobacco. It is interesting to here any beneficial results revolving around the word tobacco, even though the association here is rather loose in my opinion. I feel that this title may be controversial due to the fact that tobacco is not know to have many (any) positive benefits. This title may be easily misinterpreted as a beneficial effect of tobacco by consumers or those who glance rather quickly at the post.

I was not aware that tomatoes and peppers were in the same class as tobacco plants. It's amazing how the authors drew a correlation between these plants/vegetables and PD. However, since this was a retrospective study and the "treatment" group was based on self-reports, there's room for a lot of confounding variables, and I'm not really convinced that it was due to those specific vegetables, and not some other factors, such as a healthier life style, or due to other drugs.

I was unaware that vegetables such as peppers and tomatoes are in the same family as tobacco. This article is definitely designed to be an eye catcher, but it would be a great benefit if further studies can provide statistical evidence that members of the Solanaceae family can help reduce the risk of Parkinson's. The results from the current study are exciting, but the fact that their evidence is based on retrospective observation of their subjects puts the reliability to question. Hopefully, further researches will explore this topic more thoroughly.

It would be interesting to analyze the level of processed food consumption in the sample. It would be great to contrast that variable among groups in order to observe if there is a true association between consuming plants from the same botanical family as tobacco or merely the absence of degenerative compounds present in processed foods.

I found the results intriguing and look forward to additional studies. The statements that this is different than tobacco, since the product is actually the plant confuse me. I found the relationship on tobacco use quite interesting, since the product is the vegetable, yet patients that benefitted were the non-smoker or less than 10 years of smoking. I would like to see an extensive study on PD patients with greater than a 10 yr. pack history and see if the theory hold true for that population.

It seems that the method for collecting data in this study is very subject to recollection bias since it relies on patient reports. Many times, subjects may just report a diet that they think the researchers want to hear (nobody likes admitting to having an unhealthy diet!). Because of this, the results may seem more likely to favor a positive outcome.

I agree with keeli in that it is important to note that this doesn't have much to do with tobacco. Also, I agree that there are entirely too many confounding variables in this study that could affect the results. We should research more on the components of these vegetables and their effect on reducing Parkinson's risk.

While I agree with Keeli and tb that the specifics are lacking as far as tobacco reducing the risk of Parkinson's Disease, I still find the idea interesting. Perhaps the lycopene component is related to the idea presented that patients who are more tobacco naive are more likely to see the Parkinson's risk reduction than those who have been smoking for many years. I wonder if the same would be true to patients who haven't consumed as much of the given vegetables as opposed to patients who have.

The investigators conclude: "Dietary nicotine or other constituents of tobacco and peppers may reduce PD risk" so I would hope the next study would help tease out whether the benefit is due to dietary nicotine, or wether it is due to peppers, or "other constituents of tobacco"

The other question I have is that the investigators found the protective effects were largely in men and women who had never used tobacco or who had smoked cigarettes <10 years. My question is WHY? Is this a temporal thing? Is this benefit something that occurs, and then the patient or subject develops tolerance to the product?

We will need further studies to figure the correlations more definitively.

At first glance my thoughts were..what? So I just wanted to point out that the plants that are being discussed that may help to reduce the risk of PD are actually the VEGETABLES (like peppers) that are in the same plant family as tobacco, NOT tobacco products. The article specifically mentions that the "benefits appeared to be more common among men and women who had never used tobacco or who had smoked cigarettes for fewer than 10 years." The title definitely caught my attention though.

It seems like there would be a lot of confounding variables in this study. Self reporting of food intake is a very unreliable measure of usage, and it seems like it is hard to say that people who eat more of these particular veggies will have lower risk of developing Parkinson's. People who eat these veggies have healthier habits as well that could affect their outcomes. Also the study did not seem to evaluate the development of Parkinson's disease, but simply compared those with Parkinson's to those without. I don't see how these conclusions can be accurately drawn from the given information.

I wonder if it is the tobacco-like properties of these plants that are beneficial to Parkinson's patients, or if it is related to lycopene content. I know tomatoes contain high amounts of the antioxidant lycopene, and I wonder if this is having more of an effect on these patients than any possible minimal stimulatory effects related to nicotine.

I wonder if it is the tobacco-like properties of these plants that are beneficial to Parkinson's patients, or if it is related to lycopene content. I know tomatoes contain high amounts of the antioxidant lycopene, and I wonder if this is having more of an effect on these patients than any possible minimal stimulatory effects related to nicotine.

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